Review by HamptonsArtHub on Ellen de Meijer at ArtHamptons 2014

Read the entire review of the ArtHamptons 2014 art fair at HamptonsArtHub.com 

Couldn't make ArtHamptons this year? Here's why HamptonsArtHub thinks it was the strongest show so far and why the details in Ellen's work keep you staring.

"(...) Portraying the aggressive side of human nature are portraitures by Ellen de Meijer (b. 1955, Amsterdam). Exhibited with UNIX New York, the paintings each feature slightly macabre people from contemporary society. The figures can don business suites or dresses but don’t look for an expression. On view at ArtHamptons are paintings from de Meijer’s “Digital Divide” series featuring “ceremony portraits” of human qualities that have become distorted from man’s modern struggle to survive, according to an artist statement. Visually, this struggle is depicted through interpretive archetypes of sophisticated businesspeople. Like life, the obvious or eye catching can be a distraction for the heart of the matter.

While the figure’s oversize faces that also disturb from the lack of human emotion is what makes people stop and stare, it’s the details that keep them there. Stare back at the picture of a bizarre girl going eye-to-eye with you…but look down to notice the strange dog at her feet and her iPod on. She’s look at you but she’s not listening. Consider the suited-up man who seems about to start giving you grief, with his pack of business posse to back him up, but notice that they may not really be with him.

de Meijer’s intent is to reveal what might go unnoticed about her figures. Behind the bravado or conquering aggressor, there are underpinnings of smallness, emotional limitation and vulnerability, according the artist statement. Still, there’s hope. The children depicted in “Digital Divide” may surmount and survive the onslaught of a relentless digital information world and the hunt for material wealth. The adults may be a different story. de Meijier is based in the Netherlands. (...)" - HamptonsArtHub, by Pat Rogers, July 13th 2014